NPS Black Belt Guide – White Belt: Taking on your boss

By Kai Crow
on 18 April 2017

(developing executive buy-in)

In the last post, we took a look at what NPS is and why you need to pay attention.

In this post, we’re gonna to take a look at how you can achieve ‘executive buy in.’

After all, if your executives are not on board, your company can’t really benefit from NPS.

The trouble is they probably won’t believe right off the bat, if you just tell them that NPS is awesome.

And so this can make it look as though achieving executive buy in is really intimidating – Even for someone like Chuck Norris.

However, you might be surprised to know that it’s actually pretty straightforward.

You see..The key, is to see things from perspective of the executives.

All you need to do is consider how implementing NPS will benefit them.

…And the best way to do that is by focusing on the business case for NPS implementation.

So with that in mind – let’s take a look at some of the ways you can convince execs to buy into the idea of NPS.

A Quick Note on Improving the Odds of Success

You might think NPS is awesome  – but your fellow exec’s might still be on the wall.

Sure, some of the executives within your organisation might be aware of the importance of improving customer satisfaction – and it’s those people you should be focusing on first.

For executives already interested in raising customer’s satisfaction consider doing the following…

  • Let them know how implementing NPS will help take things to the next level.
  • Explain why NPS data is better than what is already being used to track customer satisfaction.

You can do this by explaining some of the points we covered in the first post.

It can also be a good idea to gather some case studies from other companies (ideally from your industry).

Look for companies that have used NPS data to achieve certain goals, of which are in line with the goals of the executives you approach.

Propose a Trial and Create Mini Case Studies

Executives may be worried that NPS implementation is going to create too much disruption within the company, or even just their department.

After all no exec wants to distract employees away from their core focus – well not for no good reason anyway.

The good thing is that if NPS implemented in one part of the company, you’ll probably be able to get it implemented company wide.

That’s because you’ll be provided with a success story, that can be used to convince others that NPS is worthwhile.

So…Consider using the following approach –

  1. Propose a ‘trial’ whereby you implement NPS within a specific part of the company, say the ‘live chat’ customer service department.

Make sure you gauge where the department was before/at the start of NPS implementation.

That might mean measuring initial NPS feedback, or recording current methods of measuring customer satisfaction, such as the number support tickets raised, or even refunds.

In doing so, you can clearly document a before and after scenario.

  1. You can then use that information to develop a case study.

Be sure to tell the story of the department.

Talk about the challenges the department faced before NPS implementation and how things changed once NPS was put into action.

  1. Use this case study to persuade executives in other parts of the company, that NPS should be implemented company wide – or at least in other departments.

You’ll want to make sure that everyone is aware of these case studies.

It’s also important that you make clear how they can take advantage without too much hassle.

If you can tie improvements to changes in revenue/profit, your results and case studies in general will pack more punch.

Explain that NPS Surveys Help Prevent Social Media Horror Stories (and Increase Social Media Success Stories)

A lot of execs worry about their company becoming the victim of a social media horror story, wherein someone’s complaint about a company has gone viral.

After all, every week you hear about some company or another who’s honest mistake has been magnified on social media, causing it to gather national attention.

Thankfully, with the help of NPS data, you can drastically cut down the odds of this happening, by using the following process…

  1. Use NPS data to identify customers who are unhappy.
  2. Proactively reach out to upset customers and fix the issues ailing them.
  3. Once disgruntled customers will now be grateful that the company took action to make things better.

This proactive approach, of which is made possible thanks to NPS data, is one of the best ways to put out ‘customer service fires’ that might lead to a social media horror story.

In fact, the people who might’ve said something negative about you before, might now actually say something positive on social media instead!

If execs are aware that NPS can help them with this issue, they’ll be more likely to engage.

Tie NPS Scores to Bonuses

If you incentivize high NPS feedback, then executives, or anyone else for that matter, will likely act in their own self interest to implement NPS systems and do what’s needed in order to generate high feedback.

Your ability to do this generally depends on your if you’re the founder/ceo.

However, even if you’re not that high up in the company, you can always suggest it to someone who is right at the top.

Conclusion

You need to do the legwork necessary if you want to convince executives that NPS implementation is worth the time and effort.

We’ve covered some key strategies in this post, that you can use to generate executive buy in and these strategies can be used in isolation or simultaneously.

For the most part, it all comes down to increasing NPS visibility, and ensuring that executives are aware NPS exists and have a clear understanding as to how it can help them.

In the next part of this series, we’re going to take a look at how you can design and deploy NPS surveys, of which will bring you the most insightful and actionable data possible.

It’s going to be a good one – so make sure you look out for it!

 

(developing executive buy-in)

In the last post, we took a look at what NPS is and why you need to pay attention.

In this post, we’re gonna to take a look at how you can achieve ‘executive buy in.’

After all, if your executives are not on board, your company can’t really benefit from NPS.

The trouble is they probably won’t believe right off the bat, if you just tell them that NPS is awesome.

And so this can make it look as though achieving executive buy in is really intimidating – Even for someone like Chuck Norris.

However, you might be surprised to know that it’s actually pretty straightforward.

You see..The key, is to see things from perspective of the executives.

All you need to do is consider how implementing NPS will benefit them.

…And the best way to do that is by focusing on the business case for NPS implementation.

So with that in mind – let’s take a look at some of the ways you can convince execs to buy into the idea of NPS.

A Quick Note on Improving the Odds of Success

You might think NPS is awesome  – but your fellow exec’s might still be on the wall.

Sure, some of the executives within your organisation might be aware of the importance of improving customer satisfaction – and it’s those people you should be focusing on first.

For executives already interested in raising customer’s satisfaction consider doing the following…

  • Let them know how implementing NPS will help take things to the next level.
  • Explain why NPS data is better than what is already being used to track customer satisfaction.

You can do this by explaining some of the points we covered in the first post.

It can also be a good idea to gather some case studies from other companies (ideally from your industry).

Look for companies that have used NPS data to achieve certain goals, of which are in line with the goals of the executives you approach.

Propose a Trial and Create Mini Case Studies

Executives may be worried that NPS implementation is going to create too much disruption within the company, or even just their department.

After all no exec wants to distract employees away from their core focus – well not for no good reason anyway.

The good thing is that if NPS implemented in one part of the company, you’ll probably be able to get it implemented company wide.

That’s because you’ll be provided with a success story, that can be used to convince others that NPS is worthwhile.

So…Consider using the following approach –

  1. Propose a ‘trial’ whereby you implement NPS within a specific part of the company, say the ‘live chat’ customer service department.

Make sure you gauge where the department was before/at the start of NPS implementation.

That might mean measuring initial NPS feedback, or recording current methods of measuring customer satisfaction, such as the number support tickets raised, or even refunds.

In doing so, you can clearly document a before and after scenario.

  1. You can then use that information to develop a case study.

Be sure to tell the story of the department.

Talk about the challenges the department faced before NPS implementation and how things changed once NPS was put into action.

  1. Use this case study to persuade executives in other parts of the company, that NPS should be implemented company wide – or at least in other departments.

You’ll want to make sure that everyone is aware of these case studies.

It’s also important that you make clear how they can take advantage without too much hassle.

If you can tie improvements to changes in revenue/profit, your results and case studies in general will pack more punch.

Explain that NPS Surveys Help Prevent Social Media Horror Stories (and Increase Social Media Success Stories)

A lot of execs worry about their company becoming the victim of a social media horror story, wherein someone’s complaint about a company has gone viral.

After all, every week you hear about some company or another who’s honest mistake has been magnified on social media, causing it to gather national attention.

Thankfully, with the help of NPS data, you can drastically cut down the odds of this happening, by using the following process…

  1. Use NPS data to identify customers who are unhappy.
  2. Proactively reach out to upset customers and fix the issues ailing them.
  3. Once disgruntled customers will now be grateful that the company took action to make things better.

This proactive approach, of which is made possible thanks to NPS data, is one of the best ways to put out ‘customer service fires’ that might lead to a social media horror story.

In fact, the people who might’ve said something negative about you before, might now actually say something positive on social media instead!

If execs are aware that NPS can help them with this issue, they’ll be more likely to engage.

Tie NPS Scores to Bonuses

If you incentivize high NPS feedback, then executives, or anyone else for that matter, will likely act in their own self interest to implement NPS systems and do what’s needed in order to generate high feedback.

Your ability to do this generally depends on your if you’re the founder/ceo.

However, even if you’re not that high up in the company, you can always suggest it to someone who is right at the top.

Conclusion

You need to do the legwork necessary if you want to convince executives that NPS implementation is worth the time and effort.

We’ve covered some key strategies in this post, that you can use to generate executive buy in and these strategies can be used in isolation or simultaneously.

For the most part, it all comes down to increasing NPS visibility, and ensuring that executives are aware NPS exists and have a clear understanding as to how it can help them.

In the next part of this series, we’re going to take a look at how you can design and deploy NPS surveys, of which will bring you the most insightful and actionable data possible.

It’s going to be a good one – so make sure you look out for it!

 


About the author

Kai Crow

Kai is based in our Auckland, New Zealand office and while his name means ‘food’ in the New Zealand native language of Maori he is not actually edible. When he’s not keeping our sales and marketing stuff running, Kai’s out riding a mountain bike or running down the beach with his two dogs, Rufus and Sparky.

Other posts by Kai Crow

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